J

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T H E 
J O S H U A
A R O N S O N

I N T E R V I E W

T H E 

P R E S E N T

T H E  

P R E S E N T

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past

future

&

 p r e s e n t

 Joshua D. Aronson is no stranger to the lens as his taste in sound. 

Photographs that speak louder than a bullet.

 JDS's  takes one's eyes to new perspectives never before seen.

Capturing miniature worlds across the pages of the New York Times to A$AP BARI. 

A few questions later

...

We dove into the past and future of his work all in the

now.

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I

—  

D R A K E

 "

I think the future holds a shift. 

TRAVIS SCOTT

TRAVIS SCOTT

J O S H U A

A / F :

What are you doing today?

J D A :

I’m at home in New York, looking through old photographs.

When did you start shooting, did someone give you your first camera?

I never really dreamed of being a photographer when I was younger. In fact, I never even became interested in my own images until about a year ago. But, among young, emerging artists, I have a desire to form a sense of community. I’ve found photography is a nice way of doing so.

What’s the first thing you do when shooting an icon?

“Say cheese!”

You told a story about the night kicking back with Travis Scott, how was that experience?

I like Travis because he’s open-minded. I want to be clear: in hip-hop, being open-minded is rare.  

The Kaplan twins?

The Kaplan Twins and I made some images for a series on emerging Los Angeles artists for MADE. In Miami, I photographed a similar series for i-D. I want to do the same in New York, so I’m working with artists here like Dozie Kanu, Jackson Shea, Kai and Adrian Schachter, and Alexander Muret. I also want to bring the series to London. Then Paris, and Tokyo, and so on. It’s a very iterative model.

Worst trend in photography?

I try not to focus on trends. There are bad photos, but what is a bad trend? What I focus on is my responsibility to add to the conversation. Photography is just a way of disseminating an idea to many people at a time.

What do you do in between shoots?

I like to look at a lot of art when I'm not shooting. Sterling Ruby and Tom Sachs are two of my favorite artists. I like to look at installation art in particular because installations represent miniature worlds. When I'm photographing a subject, my goal is to create a complete world. A place to get lost in.

Film or digital?

Film, but I have never been against digital. Digital is only one possibility surrounded by many other possibilities worth exploring.

Social media?

Something I'm very thankful for. I have multiple Instagram accounts–9, maybe–but I tend to tread lightly.

Where is your career going in the next 10 years?

I’m not sure where my career will be. Maybe I’m too obsessed with the present to care. But, I think the future holds a shift. The future will be far from black and white. The future is process over product.

How do you deliver a true or core feeling in your imagery?

I’m not sure whether there is a true or core feeling in my images. I notice a lot of photographers today are only interested in beauty. My interest is in representation. In a way, I think representation brings me closer to truth–whatever that is–than beauty.

Next shoot?

I’d like to document museum attendants around the world. And conduct an interview project with Virgil Abloh’s “FINE PRINT”. Maybe publish a book with Dashwood in New York. And continue to collaborate with fashion designers. I hope to pave the way for future fashion collaborations amongst my kin.

Who’s a legend that you look up to as a photographer?

I really enjoy the work of Tyrone and Mark Lebon. Tyrone’s book, Nothing Lasts Forever, is particularly good. Otherwise, I appreciate photographers my age like Tyler Mitchell and Grace Ahlbom.  

Advice to fellow readers and admirers of your work?

If you’re only focused on the chances of you making it, you’ll probably never make it, because you’ll realize how slim those chances really are. AF

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